Sprint upbeat on sale of iDen network

US carrier Sprint Nextel shrugged off market concerns that it was having difficulties selling its iDen wireless network, saying it had multiple options, a Reuters report said.

Sprint has been considering a sale of the iDen network, an asset it bought through its acquisition of Nextel in 2005 but struggled to integrate, the Reuters report said.

Some analysts have questioned whether it could get a good deal amid a troubled financial market.

'We don't have to do this. If we get an offer that's compelling and delivering and all sorts of other things, we'll absolutely consider it. If we don't, we'll hold on to it. It's a valuable asset,' Sprint CEO Dan Hesse, quoted by the report, said.

Pali Capital analyst Walter Piecyk said Hesse's comments suggested there was a bid, or multiple bids, with which Sprint was happy.

'If there were no bidders or if the prices of those bidders were too low, there would be no point in saying they were looking at options,' he said, adding that the market may now be reassessing its previously low estimate of iDen's value.

Piecyk also said investors may be relieved simply by the absence of bad news, amid challenges like the popularity of Apple's iPhone -- which comes with service by rival AT&T-- and the weak economy.

'There was probably some concern that given all the positive press about the iPhone that maybe the company was going to come in and lower guidance,' he said.

CEO Hesse said there was little impact yet from the weaker US economy, and troubled financial sector.

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