Cox goes with LTE-ready CDMA

Huawei Technologies announced it is has been chosen to provide a CDMA, Long Term Evolution (LTE) ready network to Cox Communications. The cable provider, which won spectrum in the 700 MHz auction, will launch its 3G network using Huawei's SingleRAN solution and 3900 series base stations.

"We are committed to enhancing the experience of our customers through the addition of wireless service to the Cox bundle," said Stephen Bye, Cox's vice president of wireless in a press release.

What is interesting is Cox's decision to deploy CDMA EV-DO technology rather than HSPA. However, a number of CDMA operators, including Verizon Wireless, KDDI and SK Telecom, are planning to transition to LTE as well. A deployment of LTE will be a forklift change for every operator. Cox also owns other spectrum in the 1.7 GHz, which may be used for CDMA, leaving the 700 MHz band for LTE.

Last year, Huawei said it would provide network solutions for UMTS, CDMA and LTE technologies for the 700 MHz band. Multi-band operation will be supported with concurrent operation in the 700 MHz, 850 MHz, Advanced Wireless Services and 1900 MHz spectrum bands. Using software defined radios, the base station portfolio will support dual-mode operation for CDMA + LTE and UMTS + LTE technologies, allowing operators to carry out smooth network evolution from UMTS or CDMA to LTE, said Huawei.

Huawei also has deals with Leap Wireless and Canada's Telus and Bell Mobility. Those two operators are overlaying their CDMA networks with HSPA technology by 2010 with an eventual move to LTE technology. Huawei was also recently awarded the world's first LTE contract by TeliaSonera and it is said to be a finalist for a WiMAX contract with Clearwire.

For more:
- see this release

Related articles:
Report: Huawei is a finalist for Clearwire infrastructure deal
Huawei announces plans for 700 MHz
Canada's CDMA operators defect to HSPA/LTE

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