Huawei targets LTE Broadcast, Wi-Fi backhaul

Huawei announced the opening of an innovation center focused on LTE Broadcast and separately announced deployment of its FTTx Wi-Fi backhaul solution by China Mobile in Shandong.

The Chinese vendor's innovation center focused on enhanced Multimedia Broadcast Multicast Service (eMBMS) opened in Shenzhen and is aimed at developing end-to-end eMBMS solutions and LTE applications based upon the GPP R9 standard for mobile video that enables a higher transfer capacity over typical MBMS technologies.

The eMBMS innovation center will target on-demand video services and broadcast information based on eMBMS and also serve as an experience center for operators, said Huawei, adding that operators from Europe, Asia, the South Pacific and other regions have already visited the center to experience its LTE demonstrations.

In other news, Huawei's FTTW (fiber to the WLAN) Wi-Fi backhaul solution will be used by China Mobile Shandong Branch in its deployment of WLAN mobile backhaul across 17 cities of Shandong province. The Huawei solution uses GPON access technology to backhaul WLAN data streams, providing 54 Mbps Internet access for 50,000 WLAN hotspots in schools, offices, transport hubs, hotels, leisure places, and downtown and residential areas.

Huawei said that compared with traditional mobile backhaul networks, its FTTW solution "saves fibers, ensures a high investment utilization rate, and allows for easy network maintenance and efficient fault location." The FTTW solution also supports Power over Ethernet (PoE) to reduce routing workload for WLAN AP power supply.

For more:
For more see this Huawei release and this release

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