Lawmakers enter white-space debate

Groups on both sides of the white-space debate issued a flurry of press releases and email alerts last week following an engineering report from the FCC that concluded white-space devices with geolocation and sensing technologies could be used with some conditions without interference. FCC Chairman Kevin Martin is now pushing the concept with an FCC vote set for Nov. 4.

Apparently both sides are conducting some heavy lobbying on Capitol Hill as lawmakers have stepped in to influence the FCC on the matter. Several members of Congress are urging a delay to the Nov. 4 vote, while U.S. Sen. John Kerry is in favor of a vote. Meanwhile, several groups, including broadcast associations, TV network chiefs and even the New York City Council are pushing for a comment period on the engineering report.

The National Association of Broadcasters, which vehemently opposes unlicensed white-space devices because they say they will cause too much interference, has filed an emergency petition to essentially delay the vote by asking for more time for public comment. White-space devices are supported by the likes of Google, Motorola and Microsoft, among others.

For more:
- see this article
- see Kerry's letter

Related articles:
Motorola, NAB press cases before FCC white-space vote
FCC set to vote on white-space issue Nov. 4

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