AT&T survives 'Operation Chokehold'

"Operation Chokehold" came and went on Friday afternoon, and AT&T Mobility's network survived the stunt.

operation chokehold att iphone appleThe idea, first sparked in a satirical blog post by Newsweek columnist Dan Lyons on his blog, "The Secret Diary of Steve Jobs," was for iPhone owners to use data-intensive applications to cripple AT&T's data network in response to what they see as inferior service as well as possible usage-based pricing fees. The stunt took on a life of its own, with its own Facebook page and website.

The results were decidedly mixed. There were scattered reports of network difficulties, but AT&T's macro network appears to have held up fine. "We saw no impact," AT&T told ABCNews.com.

Peter Serven, the founder of the movement's Facebook page and website, called the exercise a success. "The goal is to send a message to AT&T," he told ABCNews.com. "It was a pretty strong message."

AT&T Mobility CEO Ralph de la Vega said last week the company had not yet decided whether it would change its data plan price structure to a usage-based model, but said AT&T was actively looking for ways to move more traffic off its cellular network, such as providing free WiFi hotspots and promoting femtocells.

For more:
- see this ABCNews.com article
- see this Fortune blog post

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