Cricket takes PayGo plan nationwide

Leap Wireless is taking its daily unlimited rate plan, PayGo, and offering it nationwide. The plan, which provides customers with unlimited service for $1, $2 or $3 per day, was first launched about six months ago in three markets and sold via Wal-Mart stores.  Now Leap is taking the plan nationwide and offering it in all of its company-owned stores, authorized agents and other retail partners such as General Stores. 

The $1 plan includes unlimited local calling and voicemail, caller ID and three-way calling. The $2 plan offers the same as the $1 plan plus unlimited text and picture messaging. And the $3 plan adds unlimited U.S. long distance, international texting, mobile Web and directory assistance. The plans are available with three Samsung devices, ranging in price from $30 to $40.

With the economy in the tank, consumers are looking for a cheap and easy wireless deal, and prepaid providers such as Leap's Cricket Wireless are capitalizing on that trend. Jeff Toig, vice president of product marketing with Cricket, said in an interview with FierceWireless, that Leap wants to dominate the low-end segment of the wireless market and these PayGo plans fit in with that strategy. "We have seen significant growth in the prepaid space," Toig said.

But Cricket isn't the only player going after this market. Boost Mobile has a Pay as You Go plan that offers a flat-rate of 10 cents per minute for all calls, no matter what time of day. Users can also get unlimited nationwide push-to-talk service for a flat-fee of $1 per day.

For more:
- see this photo of the PayGo phone here

Related articles:
Boost Mobile, Cricket simplify rate plans
Cricket Wireless releases two Samsung AWS handsets
Leap introduces Cricket services in Chicago
Leap Brings Cricket Unlimited Wireless Services to Philadelphia

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