FCC's 3.5 GHz plans spark debate over spectrum sharing, unlicensed use

The FCC's proposal to create a Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS) in the 3.5 GHz band is revolutionary in many aspects, but some are concerned that this uniqueness--particularly as it applies to the spectrum band plan--might have unintended ramifications in the United States as well as globally. There is much to be decided before the 3.5 GHz CBRS is finally launched. Comments on the FCC's proceeding are due July 14, with replies due Aug. 1. Much of the focus of participants has been on the ground-breaking effort to use complicated spectrum-sharing techniques to free up the targeted spectrum. The FCC's three-tiered access and sharing model would be comprised of federal and non-federal incumbents, priority access licensees (PALs) and general authorized access (GAA) users. Yet even that basic structure is being debated. For more on the debate, check out this FierceWirelessTech special report.

Sponsored by ADI

What if we were always connected? With the help of our advanced wireless technology, even people in the most remote places could always be in touch.

What if there were no ocean, desert, mountain or event that could ever keep us from telling our stories, sharing discoveries or asking for help? ADI’s next-gen communications technology could keep all of us connected.

Suggested Articles

European countries do not yet score highly on the proportion of connected time spent on 5G. UK users spent only 4.5% of their time connected to 5G.

Dish Network inked four fiber deals for backhaul and fronthaul to support its new nationwide 5G network.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai announced he plans to leave the FCC on Inauguration Day, January 20, 2021.