Report: Samsung considers blocking sales of Apple's new iPhone

Samsung is considering legal action on whether to block the sale of Apple's (NASDAQ:AAPL) next iPhone, which is widely expected to be available in October, according to a Reuters article. 

The report, which cited an unnamed source familiar with the matter, said it is unclear where Samsung might take such legal action. The Maeil Business Newspaper reported that Samsung may seek an injunction request on Apple's new iPhone in Europe. If Samsung took such a step, it would represent the strongest salvo in what has become a nearly six-month-long patent battle spanning multiple continents.

A Samsung representative told Reuters the company would not comment on ongoing legal issues. An Apple spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Apple has so far successfully blocked Samsung from selling its Galaxy Tab 10.1 and Galaxy Tab 7.7 Android tablets in Germany, some smartphones in the Netherlands and has forced Samsung to indefinitely delay its tablet plans in Australia. Samsung this week filed an appeal in the German case and also countersued Apple in Australia.

After Samsung lost the court battle in Germany earlier this month, it said it would explore all legal options. 

The two companies have been locked in an escalating patent battle since April when Apple accused Samsung of "slavishly" copying the iPhone and iPad. Apple became the world's largest smartphone vendor by volume in the second quarter, and analysts said Samsung was not far behind it in the No. 2 spot. Samsung provides chipsets for Apple's smartphones and tablets, which makes the dispute that much more awkward.

For more:
- see this Reuters article
- see this Bloomberg article

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