Wrap up: CTIA Wireless 2012

The carrier roundtable keynote during the show included, from left to right, Verizon's Dan Mead, T-Mobile's Philipp Humm, Sprint's Dan Hesse and AT&T's Ralph de la Vega.

The Fierce crew was out in force this week in New Orleans for the annual CTIA Wireless conference. Between the keynotes, meetings, panels and show floor, there was a lot to cover as the industry gathered for its annual confab in the Big Easy. FierceWireless editors also took some time to observe key trends at the show:

  • AT&T Mobility (NYSE:T) brought to life the concept behind its new Digital Life home automation and security service at a stately New Orleans Garden District home. However, FierceWireless Editor in Chief Sue Marek noted that pricing was noticably absent from the discussion and it's unclear how long it will take for such services to take hold in the market.
  • It's not game over for Microsoft's (NASDAQ:MSFT) Windows Phone platform, but the window of opportunity is closing. It may seem like a moon shot, but FierceWirleess Editor Phil Goldstein found Microsoft has a chance to make the operating system fly with its forthcoming "Apollo" update. 
  • Should content providers like Netflix and Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) pay wireless carriers so that mobile customers can visit their sites for free? Some wireless carriers seem to think so. However, will carriers ever get content providers to pay up? FierceWireless Executive Editor Mike Dano is skeptical. 
  • Be sure to revisit this slideshow of the devices announced at the show and this one of the crazy things found on the show floor.
  • FierceWireless will produce a scorecard next week of the winners and losers of the show. In the meantime, all CTIA show coverage can be found here.

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